Friday, December 18, 2009

Attention Parents: Your Kid Is Freezing

In the afternoons, I work with a special-ed child who attends one of the local MO yeshivot. The children are taken outside for recess every day, despite the temperature, unless it is raining or snowing. I think it's a little bit crazy to send kids out to play for 45 minutes in 30 degree (farenheit) weather, but that's what the school does. Many of the girls come to school wearing flippy little skirts, thin tights or lacy socks, ballet flats, thin cotton shirts without a sweater on top, etc. Their outfits were obviously chosen to be "cute" (and they are) but they do not protect the girls from the freezing temperatures. Many of the kids (boys and girls) do not have hats or gloves. Some of the jackets have broken zippers, so even though we try to zip everyone up before going outside, some of the children run around the playground with their jackets open and half falling off of them. By the time we bring them back in, their skin is frozen and their noses are running.
This morning Supermangirl complained that her class was taken on a short trip yesterday and that she was cold on the bus because she didn't have her hat with her. I felt really bad about that. She wears warm boots and a sweatshirt and a thick coat and gloves every day, but she was still cold. (This morning I made sure that she had her hat with her.)

So parents: please make sure that your child is dressed warmly enough for whatever the day may bring.

(And please, stick a tissue or two in his pocket before he leaves the house. We teachers are really tired of seeing your kids wipe their noses on their sleeves.)


6 comments:

tesyaa said...

Little kids and specials needs kids, and others who can't use their own judgment, need their parents and caretakers to help them dress properly. However, it was 18 degrees this morning and both my middle school daughters went to school in Converse sneakers and ankle socks. I advise them what the weather is like, but its unbelievable how little they wear in terms of warm weather gear. They feel that they go from the house to the car to school, so there's no need to cover up. I, however, always assume the worst might happen, like the car will ch"v break down and I'll have to walk a mile.

ilanadavita said...

We teachers are really tired of seeing your kids wipe their noses on their sleeves
We are indeed! Tired and disgusted when the kids are over 15 as in my school.

Mrs. S. said...

Overheard after shul this past Shabbat in the Golan, where it was pouring rain and very cold:

MOTHER: {notices that her teenage son is shivering} Where's your jacket?

SON: {shrugs} I forgot to take it with me when I went to shul this morning...

SubWife said...

Back in Russia, we would go for a walk during recess no matter how cold. The only thing is - no one would ever dream of coming to school without a hat, gloves, scarf and a warm sweater. Tights were an indisputable fact of winter. It pained me to see a little girl (2-3 yo) with only ankle socks on in 14 degree weather. I wanted to talk to the mother, but stopped myself. she did have a jacket on, but socks??? that kid was freezing. And when I see little kids outside in this weather without hats - ugh!!!

Upper West Side Mom said...

I just bought my girls new knee length down coats with a hood so when they go outside for recess they will be warm. I also make sure that they have on a pair of leggings when it is cold out and if someone gives me a hard time about wearing them I quietly pack the legging in their knapsack. They generally come home with the packed leggings on their legs!

This is one of the few "motherly" things I do. I have to admit that I don't always pack tissues or snacks when I should.

observer said...

Actaully, I think the school is right on the money. Most children direly need the physical release, and they really don't get it when they stay inside. It won't hurt them, unless a kid is already sick or is not properly dressed. Do the parents know that the kids go out to play every day? If they do, then sending the kid to school that way is, at best, negligent. It also teaches kids (especially girls) some pretty awful lessons.